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Invelos Forums->Posts by eommen Page: 1  Previous   Next
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Quoting Phil Menard:
Quote:
Thank you Mithi! Worked perfectly.

Now I have to wonder how I messed it up in the first place. 


IIRC "Starts with" is the default option. It also gets reset, I think, when installing a newer version, like v4.0 over v3.7. So it isn't necessarily you... 
Posted:
Topic Replies: 3, Topic Views: 680
So who's the oldest grumpiest    IT-person in this thread?

In my early twenties when I was studying physics and IT at university, started using mainframe computers using paper tape and 8 inch floppy disks (mini computers, one interfaced by the legendary —and noisy— Teletype 33) as well as punched cards and a TSO terminal for the mainframe. Had my personal back-up storage on DEC-tape. Programming in Algol60, Fortran, APL, PL/1, Pascal, DEC PDP assembler and not to forget IBM mainframe JCL — byzantine unless you really understood the hardware...
The PC arrived at that time. Started out with a Commodore 64 doing my own word processing (and of course games). Migrated to a proper PC, though not from IBM, OS was DOS, I think it was v3.0. If memory serves me well it relieved me of about 15,000 Dutch guilders, at current (!!) conversion rates 6800 € (±7000 $ or ±6600 £).
Also in my profession as IT consultant, using the first usable (IMHO) PC graphic interface: GEM, using a very good CASE tool which I never saw matched on Windows. 5 inch floppy disk era, no proper alternative. No internet, just Compuserve text based dial-in interface.
Worked for a telco when mobile phones started to be more affordable and common, from 1997 onward. Mind you, the smartphone era was still a decade in the future then.

I know there are still other 'ancient ones' active on this site, but who?
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Topic Replies: 14, Topic Views: 2386
Seems like a proper bug for Invelos to work on.
If you're familiar with programming you may have noticed that when you invoke a change by clicking on OK, Save, or similar changes are immediately carried through in your local database before control is handed back to the user. Since the UPC/EAN is the heart of the identification of a profile, changing the UPC, among others, means also changing the file names of the front and back cover as stored on your PC. When your next action is pasting another cover image it means storing that under the new name. And obviously, the bug is activated somewhere along the route. Could be the old file name still persists somewhere, (re)coding to .jpg as DVDp's cover storage format has a bug related to the id change, etc. etc. Nice one for Ken to puzzle on 

Just my 2 cents.
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Topic Replies: 3, Topic Views: 837
Quoting bigdog:
Quote:
...backing it up to a flash drive (I guess I could use a NAS drive too?)...


Anything that your old computer can write your backup file to and your new computer can read will do. Whether that's a NAS, cloud storage, a removeable disk (USB/flash/SD card, USB/portable hard disk, ...). Just check the size of the backup file when created to avoid problems...
Though paper tape punch and floppy disks are a bit outdated I'm afraid         
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Topic Replies: 14, Topic Views: 2386
Perhaps stating the obvious, but do not forget to copy your registration data (actually, of every application you want to 'migrate'). As long as you can log on to this site, your registration data can also be found in the 'Registration' tab of this website's main menu.
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Topic Replies: 14, Topic Views: 2386
Yes, there is.

Select the movies you want to move by flagging them. (Flag by clicking on the box to the left of the title, or use CTRL-A if you made a selection with the filters options).
Then from the menu: Collection -> Flagged -> Move To... -> (list of all cutum tabs).
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Topic Replies: 1, Topic Views: 640
Marvin,

You registered here some 12 years ago, so you're quite an experienced (PC) user. This version of DVDprofiler is already out some 1½ year and hasn't changed since. So it is not likely this program is at fault. You may have changed your PC configuration (including installing or updating other programs) or Microsoft may have slipped in a maintenance update — they do that monthly — that had this effect.

Either way, you'll need to provide a lot more info if you want fellow users to give more useful responses...
So for now: was the printer plugged into a socket? Powered on? Paper inside? Cable properly connected to the PC (etc etc) 
Posted:
Topic Replies: 2, Topic Views: 1017
Well, Germany is well represented with over 110,000 entries in the DVDprofiler online database.

"The Sting" is there with 9 (!) german entries but "The Sting II" is absent. Which means that whoever bought that DVD was not AND a DVDprofiler user AND willing to contribute the german localised version. Actually there are only 3 entries for "The Sting II" in the whole database (Brazil, USA, Hong Kong) — set Region, BD Region and Locality to "any " on the "add DVDs to collection/By title" window and you'll see. The USA entry looks promising enough to use as a base for a German version in your collection.
The low presence count just means it didn't attract many DVDprofiler users to buy it...
By the way, the search algoritm looks in both the orginal title and the localised (=translated) title.

In its early days IMDB was just as much user contributed as DVDprofiler. But since IMDB has grown into a well known site it gets additional support info from movie studies (as far as I've heard).

Many DVDp users pride themselves that this database is far more accurate than IMDB. There are numerous threads that detail that. Note though that IMDB is focused on movies whereas this database is focused on DVD/BluRay disks. Hence DVDprofiler has additional fields in your local database to document where you left the disk, where you bought it and for what price and so on. See the "Personalise DVD" window (CTRL p) for details. Also to document features on the disk, like which audio tracks, which subtitles, which extras like documentaries and so on. For this see the Edit window (CTRL e).

Anyway, if your craving is to buy the odd / rare / cheap DVD, nothing wrong with that in itself, there may not be that many people like you. Certainly if that movie was never a big success in the theaters. Which goes some way to explain its absence.
And, coming back to the above: The Sting II is present in the DVDprofiler online database, just not its Germany localised publication...
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Topic Replies: 12, Topic Views: 3435
I am missing some data to provide you with full info, but here goes.

The DVDprofiler database is organised with a primary key on the combination of country code and UPC/EAN-code (in its absence the disk ID).
For instance the full database has at present around 832,00 entries (DVD, BluRay etc combined). Of those, for instance, ± 208,000 are USA located entries, ±85,000 UK, ±54,000 Netherlands and at the other side of the range 2 for Vietnam and one from Peru. No offence to those countries, all entries were user contributed so the numbers show where most DVDprofiler users are located.
Your country could be one with just very few entries. It is also possible you have a real oddball collection of DVDs , but I don't want to assume that too quickly. Your post doesn't indicate your country (or the country where your DVD's came from).

If it is not a country with a sizeable count you may want to dowbload a very similar profile from aonther country if that is good enough for you. Please do not contribute it to the online database as from your own country though, unless you have thoroughly corrected all data items specific to your own country.

To see the numbers: Choose "Add DVDs to Collection" either from the menu or click the button or use CTRL-Ins. Select the "By Title" tab and change Region and BD Region to "Any Region". Change Locality to your country (or another) and you'll see the volume numbers above.

Finally, again, this is a user contributed database. It all depends on the volume of contributors. For instance, A few years ago some huge contributors of UK profiles changed their focus and left here, meaning current UK contribution rate is substantially lower than it once was. Just as an example.

Just curious: your registration date states 2015. Did you left using it dormant for 4 years?
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Topic Replies: 12, Topic Views: 3435
Why not the most common accent characters (diacritics)?
Well, Ken/Invelos could indulge you, sure.
But why would he spend time and effort on something that is readily available from Microsoft itself in various ways — as the previous posts show.

® and © are in there already, but only in the overview tab of the Edit window. But they're missing in other places (like adding notes), or on this web-page to enter a post. So any consistent and good implementation would, IMHO, require a lot more coding.

Also, English writing users may need some assistance as the use of diacritics is extremely rare in that language. Sure. But there are many DVDp users with other native language(s) that can cope very well with the means already in the operating system. AltGr isn't that bad...

I don't know if there'll ever be a next program version with the dwindling interest in disks. We'll have to wait and see (on a Monday    ).
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Topic Replies: 9, Topic Views: 3116
Quoting The Movieman:
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I still think the common accents should be built in. I mean, the (C) and (R) have been added and those too could easily be punched in. I also don't feel comfortable having to change my keyboard settings, besides seems like a bit of work to do so for this one program. Still don't see why it's a bad idea to include it for those who don't want a print out and search up and down trying to find the right one.

But this all moot since who knows when there will be a major update... 


Please look first which special characters you often use and are not catered for by AltGr or numeric ALT codes. AFAIK you don't need to change keyboard for the numeric ALT codes; again AFAIK for a USA styled keyboard (as in not the USA-international) all AltGr shortcuts should work as displayed my overview. The USA-International keyboard is useful for having dead keys that in turn produce the accented vowels. Try the AltGr and let me know if you tried and got fails.

Of the characters you asked for:
ALT 0134 equals †
AltGr r equals ®
AltGr c equals ©
And see my previous overview for all the accented characters thus catered for.

The plus side is that AltGr and numeric ALT codes are available right now for you.

TIP If you don't want it printed, save the file on your desktop and/or pin a link to the task bar. That way you're only a click or double-click away from having a peek at the overview.
Only if you're using a laptop sans numeric keyboard you may need to consult your manual — usually it requres using the Fn key.
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Topic Replies: 9, Topic Views: 3116
This is very much already built-in in Windows. No need to duplicate in DVDp.

You may want to switch your keyboard in Windows/Settings to "USA international": this is not under "Devices", but part of "Time&Language", then "Language", then click on the current language like "English (United States)". Then choose "options" and you'll finally arrive at the place to add/alter your keyboard settings. It used to be easier to find in the old "Control Panel", but hey... Alternatively you could check out a Microsoft tool to adapt your keyboard — haven't tried that myself though. There is also the Character Map tool; a standard Windows tool to be found in Windows Accessories.

Once the keyboard is set to USA-international use the dead keys ^, `, ', ~ and " to combine with a, e, i, u, ,o, n etc to produce the diacritics.

Yet another alternative is to check the fast "Alt Gr" (the "Alt" button the the right (!) of the space bar). Alt-Gr and z produce æ, ñ when combined with n, Alt-Gr plus c gives ©, plus m equals µ, etc. For further reading.

For the ý you would need to do the old-fashioned alt+numeric code, this being ALT 0253. ALT 0151 is —.

You may find this overview I once created useful to print out and keep next to you when typing...

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Topic Replies: 9, Topic Views: 3116
Invelos Forums->Posts by eommen Page: 1  Previous   Next